High Five – The 2nd Half

“I am too positive to be doubtful, too optimistic to be fearful, and too determined to be defeated.”

Being positive about the age you are, the situation you are in, or the state of your career can be a little difficult at times – especially if you are in the “Mid-Life” stage in the year 2014. The job market isn’t that friendly to, well, anyone but less so to those who are in the 40-65 age groups. However, at this stage, you are the more likely to find the career fulfillment you’ve been searching for since you left college. According to Carl Jung who created a model called Stages of Type Development in which there are four major stages – Childhood, Adolescence and Early Adulthood, Adulthood and Mid-Life, Maturity and Wisdom – this age group stands in stage where they have assets, experience and confidence enough to make positive changes.


“I am too positive to be doubtful, too optimistic to be fearful, and too determined to be defeated.”

In short, the first half of life (Childhood through Early Adulthood) is when family and cultural influences are most import and we are seeking experiences from which to learn. The “Mid-Life” stage (Adulthood and midlife) is when a major transition in energy and interests occurs. Additionally midlife is when people become aware of limitations both in time and possibilities and prepare to meet those challenges in life’s “Second Half” stage (Maturity and Wisdom).

Early adulthood is when most people pick a career; some are content with that choice and can excel in their chosen field until retirement or beyond. Others of us pick a career, love the career, but want something additional – not just to “be happy” as has become the joke, but to find some level of fulfillment and have some form of stability. Midlife has been defined as roughly between 40 and 60 years of age; however, Jung considered 56 as the beginning of the “Second Half” stage.

Those in midlife and beyond can be assured that they still carry the qualities of being positive, optimistic and determined because they have the assets and experience to meet career challenges. J.T. O’Donnell of CAREEREALISM.com wrote a great post on “3 Must-Dos in Your 40’s to Make Sure You’re Employed in Your 50’s” so give this a read and prepare to meet your second half with a smile.


High Five – Positive Vision

“In order to carry a positive action, we must develop here a positive vision.”

I saw this quote and realized, I have not posted anything about my positive vision!


“In order to carry a positive action, we must develop here a positive vision.”

I’ve always been fascinated by psychology, I think it started with my elective classes in college. In one class, I agreed to be a graduate student’s guinea pig (the control groups included those who did homework in silence, with heavy metal or classical music. I was in the group that had to listen to classical music and do some writing while it played. Kind of tranquil actually). I didn’t know at that point that I wanted to be more involved in psychology because I was on my way to becoming a technical writer (majoring in English).

Flash forward 15 years. I am inspired by a presentation at a local ATD meeting and learned that I enjoy personality assessments and the psychology as well as working with all levels of individuals that make up an organization. Add to this, a timely report comes out stating that Organizational Psychology one of the 20 fastest growing occupations. So I obtain my MBTI Facilitator Certification and enroll in a Psychology Masters program.

The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology defines the field of Organizational Psychology as “versatile scientists specializing in human behavior in the workplace. Employers hire them—either in-house or as consultants—because their expertise results in better hires, increased productivity, reduced turnover, and lower labor costs.”

There will be more posts as I begin my education and continue my research into this interesting and growing field. Until then, I will maintain my positive vision.

High Five – One Step Starts a Long Journey

In researching positive thinking, I found a quote from Lao Tzu: “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” I immediately thought of all the journeys I wanted to undertake. It was exhilarating to know that traveling a long distance requires the simplest of motions to get started – taking the first step. That, however, is often the hardest part because there is fear – fear of risk, fear that there won’t be enough resources or fear of giving up the life you already know. But, upon consideration, that first step allows you see a different perspective – closer to your goal – and can indicate a new, positive beginning, the start of something you’ve always wanted. Fear will be there, regardless, but it will fade with each successful step.

Everyone’s journey is individual – some may include learning a new skill, breaking a bad habit (like negative thinking!), exercising more, losing weight, getting a business off the ground or writing a novel.


“A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”

The journey I am planning involves going back to college for my Masters. For many years, I looked for a profession that would combine my love of process and organization (technical writing) and convey instructions either through eLearning online or as presentations (training) and conduct individual assessments to determine group interactions and organizational functions. And, after much investigation, I found Organizational Psychology.

According to Onetonline.org, Organizational Psychologists “apply principles of psychology to human resources, administration, management, sales, and marketing problems. Activities may include policy planning; employee testing and selection, training and development; and organizational development and analysis. May work with management to organize the work setting to improve worker productivity.”

It appears to be everything in one bundle. However, taking the first step is a little unnerving. Logically, I know and I’m sharing this: with the right mindset, one step will follow another until the mile marker shows that a thousand miles has passed. So, get moving! I’ll be walking right there, too.